House System

house_system_header© Copyright. By the Hand of Nicholas Papas. Used with Permission.

The house system at The Saint Constantine School is a reflection of the integrated nature of our student life and academics, and is designed to give our students a more personalized home within the larger Saint Constantine family. Each student is sorted into one of four houses in their first week at Saint Constantine. Their house is both the heart of their community at school, and a structure through which students receive honors and discipline. Each house is governed by two faculty advisors who serve as their students’ mentors, guides, and first contact for parents wanting a big-picture view of their student’s success.

The House Shield Competition


The Saint Constantine School motto is Virtus Sapientia Gaudium. It is through these things—virtue, wisdom, and joy—that students may earn points for their houses.

Virtue—commitment to upholding values of our school and modeling those values to others.

Wisdom—demonstrating academic excellence and thoughtful decision making.

Joy—the love of neighbor and the spirit of our community shining through word and deed.

The houses compete throughout the year, as the accomplishments of their individual members earn points toward the annual awarding of the House Shield.

By vying for the House Shield each year alongside their fellow Housemates, students are encouraged to integrate their academic growth with the building of their character.  Through friendly and spirited competition in athletics, arts, and academics, students bond with their peers and put what they learn in the classroom into practice.

 

 

Helen© Copyright. By the Hand of Nicholas Papas.
Used with Permission.

THE HOUSE OF SAINT HELEN


In Hoc Signo Vincet. Under This Sign, I Conquer. 

Saint Helen, Equal to the Apostles, was the mother of Saint Constantine and faithfully served the Lord long before her son’s conversion to Christianity. After her son became Emperor, Helen went on a pilgrimage from Constantinople to Jerusalem and was shocked to find pagan temples had sprung up on many sites that were important in Christ’s life and ministry. Her tireless work resulted in over 80 churches founded in the Holy Land, and the eradication of many pagan temples. She also sought and discovered the Holy Cross, which had been buried in a tomb and forgotten. After leaving a fragment in the Holy Land, she sent the Holy Cross to join her son in Constantinople as a further sign of Christ’s blessing on his rule.

The House of Saint Helen is inspired by the perseverance and wisdom of its namesake. Like Helen, they diligently pursue Truth and comport themselves with royal dignity. Constantine and Helen found victory under the Holy Cross, and the House of Saint Helen also seeks excellence in all things through the power of Christ’s death and sacrifice.

 

THE HOUSE OF SAINT LUCY


Valare Luceo Non Uro. By Valor I Shine, But Do Not Burn. 

Saint Lucy was a young Italian woman of wealthy Roman origin who lived at the end of the third century. After the miraculous healing of her mother, Lucy converted to Christianity, consecrated her virginity to God, and refused to marry the pagan man to whom she had been betrothed. This man denounced her as a Christian and after standing trial, Lucy was condemned to a life of prostitution. When they came to drag her away, however, she was immovable–cemented in place through her faith in God. They then decided to burn her where she stood, but even after surrounding her with kindling and setting it abalze, Lucy would not burn. She was finally executed by the sword.

Members of The House of Saint Lucy value the integrity to advocate for what is right, and the courage to hold fast to those values even if it goes against popular opinion. Like Lucy, they will not be moved, and while they shine with the light of Goodness, they will not perish in flame.

Lucy

© Copyright. By the Hand of Nicholas Papas.
Used with Permission.

 

 

Anne© Copyright. By the Hand of Nicholas Papas.
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THE HOUSE OF SAINT ANNE


Nihile Sine Labore. Nothing Without Labor.

Saint Anne was the mother of Mary, mother of Christ. She and her husband Joachim lived quiet, devoted lives in Nazareth, but were barren. After fifty years of praying for a child, Anne was visited by an angel and told she would have a daughter through whom would come the salvation of the world. Anne dedicated Mary’s life to the Lord, but died while Mary was still a girl.

The House of Saint Anne is dedicated to the vital practice of building community and fostering life-changing growth with kindness. Members have great strength to bear difficult burdens, and know that with moderation and dedication, great things will be accomplished through them–even if, after great difficulty, they do not see the fruit of their labors in this lifetime.

 

 

THE HOUSE OF SAINT ELIZABETH


Dum Spiro Servio. While I Breathe, I Serve. 

Saint Elizabeth the New Martyr was the Grand Duchess of Russia and a granddaughter of Queen Victoria. After her husband was assassinated in 1905, she gave up her aristocratic life to become a nun, devoting her life to the orphaned and poor of Moscow. She opened hospitals and homes, but was exiled by the Communist regime in 1918. She and a number of other prisoners were thrown down a mine shaft, where they continued to sing hymns until they were bombarded by grenades and perished. When her body was recovered, it was discovered that Elizabeth had spent her last living moments binding the wounds of her fellow prisoners with her torn garments.

Those in the House of Saint Elizabeth hold that so long as their earthly lives last, they will serve the less fortunate with vigilance. They face trials with grace, and trust that the justice of God brings great beauty to their faithful dedication to bettering the world.

Elizabeth

© Copyright.By the Hand of Nicholas Papas
Used with Permission.